American Philological Association (143nd Annual Meeting)

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American Philological Association (143nd Annual Meeting)

JANUARY 5-8, 2012, PHILADELPHIA, PA

Appel à contributions
Date limite : 1er février 2011

 

CALLS FOR ABSTRACTS FOR ORGANIZER-REFEREED PANELS (pdf)

CALLS FOR ABSTRACTS FOR AFFILIATED GROUPS (pdf)

APA INDIVIDUAL ABSTRACT FORMATTING INSTRUCTIONS (Click here for .PDF)

SUGGESTIONS FOR AUTHORS OF ABSTRACTS FROM THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE

 

CALLS FOR ABSTRACTS FOR ORGANIZER-REFEREED PANELS

Organizer-Refereed Panels are approved by the Program Committee for presentation at a future Annual Meeting at least 18 months before that meeting takes place. For example, the Organizer-Refereed Panels to be held at the January 2012 meeting were approved by the Committee in April 2010. After approval, the Program Committee delegates all discretionary responsibility for selection of abstracts and discussants to the panel organizer(s). However, in order to ensure anonymity, all abstracts are submitted to the Executive Director's office and are then forwarded anonymously to the panel organizer(s). Abstracts must be submitted as PDF attachments to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . The deadline for submission is February 1, 2011. Members wishing to present a paper in an Organizer-Refereed Panel must have paid APA membership dues for 2011. A presenter who is responding to one of these calls for abstracts is not eligible for a waiver of the membership requirement. If a member's paper is accepted for an Organizer-Refereed Panel, that member may not submit another abstract for consideration by the Program Committee for a regular paper session.

After the February 1 deadline, the APA office will forward anonymous abstracts to panel organizers. Panels receiving fewer than four abstracts will be canceled. Abstract submissions to these panels will be returned to their authors by the APA Office. In the event that a panel has to be canceled because of inadequate response, the panel organizer(s) will be invited to resubmit their proposals as regular panels with invited speakers for consideration in competition with other program unit submissions at the April 2011 Program Committee meeting.


Caesar the litterator

Organized by Luca Grillo, Amherst College; Christopher Krebs, Harvard University; and Andrew Riggsby, University of Texas, Austin

Contemporaries recognized Caesar as an intellectual, man of letters, and orator (Suet. DJ 55), whose speeches and works enjoyed the highest admiration (e.g. Cic. Brut. 261-2; Hirtius Preface BG 8; Suet. DJ 56). And yet, despite his acknowledged talents, Caesar's writings and orations suffered a harsh fate: except for a handful of fragments, his speeches, poems, tragedies, sayings, treatises, and pamphlets are lost, which is the more regrettable as many of them were praised by Cicero (e.g. Att. 9.6a and 9.16.2, Brut. 261; cf. Suet. DJ 55), Tacitus (Dial. 21), and Quintilian (10.1.114). Furthermore, his extant works, the Commentarii, have long been treated either as works of propaganda (Barwick 1951 and Rambaud 1953) or as samples of pure prose for convenient use in classrooms. Amidst the Caesarean phrases that fill the pages of grammars and textbooks, Caesar, the literary artist, got lost, it seems.

The most recent scholarship has started to rediscover Caesar and to re-evaluate the Commentarii, following a more general trend in classical historiography which acknowledges the indissoluble unity of literary form and content in ancient historical works: since the appearance of the seminal volumes on “Caesar as an artful reporter” (1998) and on “Caesar against Liberty?” (2003), various aspects of Caesar's art have been treated: Riggsby concentrates on Caesar's De Bello Gallico as a text interacting with multiple discourses (2006); Krebs and Shadee (2006 and 2008) consider Caesar's rhetorical strategies of constructing geography in the BG; Osgood argues that Caesar's campaign in Gaul intersected with his writings (2009), and Batstone and Damon treat the BC as “an unfinished masterpiece” (2006).

The purpose of this panel is to rediscover Caesar's intellectual contributions and accomplishments and the cultural value of his writings, extant and lost, with a particular focus on his interests and contributions to the various fields.

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously. You will be notified of our decision by the end of February.


Cato the Censor's Oratorical Fragments: Texts, Contexts, and Methods
Organized by Enrica Sciarrino, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Early Roman oratory has always posited special problems of interpretation. For one thing, what we know about it depends upon two separate and yet interrelated bodies of evidence. The first includes citations from texts of speeches incorporated in later works; the second consists of comments made by the authors of these works. Second, among this latter set of testimonies the history of eloquence that Cicero (106BCE-43BCE) inserted in the Brutus is crucial. In this history Cicero asserts that the virtual founder of Roman oratory was the early second century BCE politician known as Cato the Censor (234BCE-149BCE) and claims that his speeches were mere experiments in the future form of Roman oratory, to be shaped under the decisive influence of Greek rhetoric. The aim of this panel is to return Cato's oratory to its immediate social, political, and cultural purview and confront the methodological issues that this move raises. Why is this project both necessary and timely?

The last decade has witnessed an upsurge of interest in the early phases of Latin literature (see especially, T.N. Habinek (1998) The Politics of Latin Literature; T.H. Habinek (2005) Roman Song; D. Feeney (2005) “The Beginnings of a Literature in Latin,” JRS 95: 226-40; S. Goldberg (2005) Constructing Literature in the Roman Republic: Poetry and Its Reception); this interest has also produced one of the liveliest discussions in the history of the field. On the one side are those who defend the textual status of early Latin literature by keeping their focus on poetry and its connection with Greek precedents. On the other side a few insist on the body as the primary site of knowledge, experience, and language. In this sense, the very fact that at the time poetry was the preserve of semi-enfranchised professionals and oratory belonged to the ruling class calls for a critical revision of current assumptions about Roman cultural hierarchies and requires us to think about extra-textual interlacements in new ways.

The idea behind this panel is to bring together diverse papers that focus on both textual and non-textual aspects of Cato's oratory and discuss the methodological issues raised or resolved by their approach. Topics which contributors would like to consider include: Cato's oratorical texts and their performance occasion; Cato's oratorical activities and contemporary institutional developments; Cato's oratory and the contemporary cultural scene; ritual aspects of Cato's oratory; textual aspects of Cato's oratory vis-à-vis the textuality of contemporary poetry. Please send your anonymous abstract for a 20 minute paper as a PDF attachment to the APA office at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. by February 1, 2011. Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. Anonymous abstracts will be reviewed by the panel organizer; successful applicants will be notified by March 7, 2011.


Fashioning the Good Life: The Pragmatics of Philosophical Conversion in the Fourth Century BCE

Organized by Nicholas Rynearson, University of Georgia, and James Collins, University of Southern California

In contrast to an analytical approach to ancient philosophical texts, the work of Pierre Hadot, Alexander Nehamas and Michel Foucault has placed the fashioning of a life at the center of our understanding of ancient philosophy. Hadot has emphasized the radical nature of this "art of living," since philosophy asks us to reject conventional ambitions and pursuits in favor of total commitment to a life that seems, from a traditional perspective, marked by a strange otherness (atopia). The need to persuade others to embrace this rupture with convention presents a persistent problem for the philosophical disciplines of the fourth century and beyond. In response, an increasingly formalized discourse of philosophical persuasion, protreptic, emerges in the early philosophical schools.

This panel aims to enrich our understanding of philosophy as an art of living by assessing the practical aspects of fashioning philosophical lives in the fourth century. The organizers invite papers on any aspect of this topic, with a particular focus on what conversion and the art of living looked like on the ground, in hopes of developing a toolbox for inquiry into the pragmatics of intellectual life.

While Hadot has focused on “spiritual exercises designed to ensure spiritual progress toward the ideal state of wisdom, [above all] exercises of reason... self-control and meditation” (Philosophy as a Way of Life 1995: 59), we seek a broader understanding of the philosophical life by exploring what we have termed the pragmatics of philosophical conversion. Without denying the centrality of the exercise of reason to the practice of philosophy, we take a more comprehensive view of fashioning the philosophical life, which demands a new relationship with the body and its desires; new modes of gesture, dress and comportment; new ways of conversing, reading and writing; and new relationships with others both within and outside the philosophical community.

Papers might address such questions as: What is the nature of a protreptic text, practice, or performance? What models does philosophical protreptic draw on (e.g., poetry, pre-socratic philosophy, practices of the sophists)? How does philosophical conversion relate to material circumstances, political, and cultural institutions? What are the modes of engagement between philosopher and convert (e.g., interpretative, imitative, supplemental, critical)? Through what outward signs might a convert be identified? What obstacles do tradition and convention present to philosophical conversion? How might later discourses of conversion, e.g., in the Hellenistic schools, or Christianity's appropriation of philosophical conversion, shed light on fourth-century protreptic?

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously.


Greek and Roman Coins at the Eastern Fringes of the Empires of the Classical World- New Discoveries and Current Research
Organized by Georges Depeyrot and Dubravka Ujes Morgan

Our knowledge of the coinages which circulated in the border zones on both sides of the eastern frontiers of the Classical World has constantly been enriched, thus changing considerably our understanding of the range and strength of impact of the Hellenistic and Roman empires on their contemporary neighbors, some of which were later to become, if only for a brief time, included in these empires - for example Dacia, or some of the easternmost Roman provinces in the Near East.

This panel aims to present results of a range of new studies of the economies and monetary phenomena along both sides of the frontiers of the ancient Hellenistic and Roman empires, as reflected by new coin finds and also materials from coin collections that have only recently become accessible.

We endeavor to provide a contribution to the history of the zones of contact between the Classical Greek and Roman world and their eastern neighbors by the study of the coinage, monetarization and cultural exchanges in these zones. We therefore solicit abstracts on the monetary phenomena occurring in the territories along the eastern frontiers of the Roman Empire from the North European Plain in the west, through eastern and southeastern Europe, Black Sea area, Asia Minor, to the westernmost outskirts of Parthia in the east, and beyond, i.e. the regions along both sides of the limes in its varying extents, encompassing also the previous frontiers of some of the Hellenistic empires, first of all the Macedonian, and also the Seleucid and others that temporarily held parts of southeastern Europe and the neighboring regions of Asia Minor and the Near East.

We welcome topics on the spread, reception, acceptance, use and imitation of Greek, Hellenistic and Roman coinages in these regions; also on monetarization and/or demonetarization of economies in these regions under various historical circumstances, and their integration into or secession from the classical monetary systems.

Abstracts must be received in the APA office byFebruary 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. Abstracts should be no more than one page in length, for a paper that takes between 15 and 20 minutes to deliver. Please follow the APA's instructions for formatting abstracts. Please confirm in your email that you are an APA member in good standing, with dues paid through 2011. Questions may be addressed to the panel organizers: Dr. Georges Depeyrot (France) at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. and Dr. Dubravka Ujes Morgan (USA) at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. .


Intertextuality and its Discontents

Organizers: Yelena Baraz (Princeton) & Chris van den Berg (Amherst College)
Respondent: Stephen Hinds (University of Washington)

Since the 1990's intertextuality has assumed a central role in the scholarship on ancient literature. The fruits of that shift are manifold: appreciation of the pervasive and productive character of imitation, acknowledgement that reference both appropriates and undermines a tradition, and acceptance that alluding authors interpret forerunners and offer metacritical assertions about their own texts. Still, numerous alternatives demand consideration. Our treatments tend to involve limitations of both genre and era. For example, Latin scholarship has focused on poetry—especially epic—from the Augustan and Flavian periods.

In short, intertextuality is ripe for consideration of new texts and new directions. This panel aims to identify hitherto unexplored areas of textual redirection. The problem is not solely whether we can impose the ascendant methodology onto a broader array of works—although that enterprise may prove valuable—but whether a more diverse application will alter or challenge current orthodoxy. We seek papers with fresh perspectives on textual relationships, and encourage presentations on traditionally overlooked genres, cultural practices, or terminology—including alternative theoretical models to intertextuality. Topics might include:

* Textual interplay in prose works remains grossly undertheorized, but may afford us new insights. Does the “Alexandrian footnote” differ from overt citation common to prose genres (e.g. sources in history or doxography in philosophy)? Do authors revise facts or arguments in dialogue and historiography differently from the way in which poets revise literary scenes via intertexts?
* Rhetorical education; the inculcation of verbal or ethical backstories through the cultures of memoria and personae (i.e. stock phrases, topoi, and the assumption of alternate identities). Do genres relying on these social practices offer new perspectives on authorial agency and intention? On studying the “textual unconscious”?
* Are intertextual habits language/culture-specific (e.g. Homer's legacy in Greek texts or Plato's citation of poets versus Vergil's Nachleben or Cicero's reliance on poetry)? Does belatedness or the seemingly innate character of intertextuality at Rome prime us to seek out allusions we might otherwise disregard?
* How do authors discuss “citational failures” and what are the nature and vocabulary of their discontent (theft, contaminatio, failed intentionality)?
* The intertextual strategies of material objects, visual media, or ecphrastic discourse.
* Does intertextuality suffice as a critical practice? Can classicists formulate better methods to describe the rewritings and recirculations of ancient cultural production?

To facilitate discussion final presentations must be submitted to the organizers by November 15th, 2011. Copies will be distributed to the respondent and panel members.

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously.


Latin Lexicography: Theory, Practice, and Influence from Republican Rome to the Carolingian Court

Organized by Anthony Corbeill (University of Kansas) and Matthew McGowan (Fordham University)

“The history of ancient lexicography is still largely unwritten,” as J. König and T. Whitmarsh have noted in a recent study on the Ordering of Knowledge in the Roman Empire (2007: 32). That history is the subject of this panel, which invites abstracts that treat the origins, development, or cultural function of Latin lexicography from the period of the late Republic to the epitome of Festus' Lexicon dedicated by Paul the Deacon to Charlemagne around 800 CE. We are particularly interested in contributionsthat consider the intellectual background and cultural impetus behind the theory and practice of Latin lexicography—including glossography, etymology, differentiae, and the more eclectic language encyclopedias. We also encourage submissions exploring the ways in which ancient lexicographical practice influenced Latin literature and the wider scholarly tradition in authors such as Varro, Quintilian, Aulus Gellius, or Servius. The very notion of a lexicon raises larger questions about how the Romans and later Latin speakers analyzed words, read texts, and contributed to developing theories of language, and one clear goal of this panel is to underscore the connection between Latin lexicography and Roman approaches to ordering knowledge. At the same time, our panel responds to growing interest in lexicographical studies both within the field of Classics and across the academy, e.g. J. Considine, Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe: Lexicography and the Making of Heritage (2008); E. Dickey, Ancient Greek Scholarship (2007); F. Glinister, C. Woods et al. eds., Verrius, Festus, & Paul: Lexicography, Scholarship, & Society (2007).

The history of Latin lexicography is lengthy and complex, with deep roots in Greek philosophy and close ties to the vibrant intellectual life and diverse literary culture of the Latin-speaking world from the Late Roman Republic through the Middle Ages. Thus we welcome abstracts on a wide range of topics that may include: Stoic etymological theory and Latin lexicography; Alexandrian influence on Latin glossography; the glossae in Roman education; the differentiae in Roman rhetorical treatises; the lexicographical tradition in ancient scholarship on Roman religion and law; the interrelationship of lexicography and Latin literature; the origin and influence of the first great Latin lexicon, De Verborum Significatu, of Verrius Flaccus (55 BCE—20 CE); Verrius' relationship to subsequent Latin language encyclopedias including Festus' De Verborum Significatione (late 2nd cent.), Nonius' De Compendiosa Doctrina (4th cent.), and Isidore's Etymologiae (7th cent.). This list is hardly exhaustive, but it gives some idea of the potential scope of submissions we hope to receive.

Abstracts must be received in the APA office byFebruary 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously.


Postcolonial Latin American Adaptations of Greek and Roman Drama
Organized by Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph's University)

Research on the reception of classical drama has focused on Europe, Northern America, Africa, and Australasia, but has ignored, for no justifiable reason, Latin America. Greek and Roman tragedies regarded as canonical in the West have migrated to this region since the early colonial years and have been rewritten, especially in recent decades, to suit modern social and political concerns. For example, Griselda Gambaro's Furious Antigone (1986) and José Watanabe's Antigone (1999), two of the many Latin American adaptations of Sophocles' play, appropriate a seminal story of protest against state oppression to discuss the issue of the desaparecidos, the thousands of “missing” civilians who were abducted, tortured, and murdered in secret by military and paramilitary forces during the Dirty War in Argentina and Peru respectively. Similarly, in Medea in the Mirror (1960) José Triana blends motifs from Euripides and Seneca to comment on the social and racial inequalities in pre-Revolution Cuba, whereas Jorge Alí Triana revisits Sophocles in his film Oedipus Mayor (1996) to document aspects of the Colombian Civil War waged between the army and peasant guerillas.

The attention that Latin American adaptations of Greek and Roman drama have so far received from Anglophone classicists (Nelli 2009, 2010; Nikoloutsos 2010, 2011; Torrance 2007) is disproportionate to their number and geographical spread. Seeking to raise awareness about this important area of research, this panel—the first of its kind to be organized at a national level—solicits papers that examine case studies and approach the topic from a variety of theoretical and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Questions to be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following:

* What is the artistic and sociohistorical context for these adaptations?
* Are they direct derivates of the Greek or Roman original, or are there other texts or traditions involved in this hybridization?
* Are these rewritings dominated by or emancipated from the ancient prototype in terms of narrative structure, character development, and ideology?
* Does this blending of classical themes with postcolonial experiences leave room for indigenous, mestizo, mulatto, or other mixed-race identities to be expressed?
* What conclusions about the migration of ideological topoi and stylistic features across Latin America can we draw from these adaptations?

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. In preparing the abstract, please follow the APA's instructions for formatting individual abstracts. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously. Inquiries can be addressed to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. .


Relapse: The Recurring Plague in the Western Tradition

Organized by Hunter Gardner, University of South Carolina

Plague narratives in the western literary tradition frequently dramatize the social bonds that are disrupted through processes of contagion. While trying to reformulate common ground for survivors, narrative accounts of socially contracted disease often wrestle with realizations of the constructedness of human values (cf. Thucydides 2.52-54). Recent (Mitchell-Boyask 2008) and not so recent (Parry 1969; Knox 1957) work on the plague's resonance in 5th century Athenian cultural productions underscores the way that nosological discourse can provide a forceful, if discomforting, vehicle for rehabilitation of the citizen body. Publications on the pandemic that swept throughout the Mediterranean world during the reign of Justinian (Little 2007; Rosen 2007) have also turned a keen eye to the historiography of disease. In particular, scholars have focused on perceptions of disease as a social construct, and on how that construct is manipulated by afflicted communities.

This panel considers the ways in which the ancient literary tradition—one that begins with the nosos afflicting the Achaean camp in Iliad 1—revisits plague narratives as a means of both reflecting on political and social instability and formulating prospects for civic recovery. Papers might address appropriation of nosological discourse within the parameters of antiquity (e.g., Lucretius' revision of the Athenian plague in De Rerum Natura), and consider how culturally specific concerns (e.g., those of late Republican Rome) shape the representation of disease and human responses to it. We also ask contributors to consider the impact of these narratives on subsequent literary discourse: what features of ancient plague narratives have become standard tropes in representations of epidemics, from Boccacio's Decameron, to Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year, to Camus' La Peste, to Tony Kushner's Angels in America? How can our understanding of the cultural anxieties expressed in ancient plague narratives shed light on the ideological frictions that have shaped later accounts of disease? To this end, we encourage contributors to consider recent representations of plague in films (e.g., Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later [2002; cf. 2007]) and texts (e.g., Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake [2004]).

Papers might also examine the various aetia of plague, from divine wrath to the accidents of nature, to human ingenuity turned against itself. How does speculation about the origin of an infection reflect upon the tenuous divides between civilized and natural worlds, divine and human realms, political harmony and civic strife? Finally, if we consider plague as a metaphor in antiquity for political destabilization, how can that metaphor's incarnation in later western discourse reveal the often precarious status of communal bonds and suggest the apparatus for their recovery?

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. In preparing the abstract, the APA's instructions for formatting individual abstracts. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously.


The Worlds of the Greek Novels

Organized by Joseph L. Rife ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) and Stephen M. Trzaskoma ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. )

Since Perry (1967) and Reardon (1971) theorized ancient Greek prose fiction as a literary response to particular societal developments, an important strand of criticism has sought to connect the texts with the real world of their authors and readers. The culmination of these investigations can be seen in the publication of Piccolo mondo antico (Liviabella, Furiani and Scarcella, eds., 1989), Le Monde du roman grec (Baslez, Hoffman, and Trédé, eds., 1992), and Fiction as History (Bowersock, 1994). More recently the discussion has been dominated by explorations of how the novels speak to the construction of a Greek identity in provincial Roman society. Much, however, remains to be done in connecting the novels to the societies that produced them. This panel seeks to reinvigorate a conversation in which the novels and related texts are seen as products of real people immersed in particular arrangements of society and material culture. Potential participants are encouraged to consider how elements of ancient fiction arose or were deployed as reflections of the worlds around them, but we are particularly interested in how the worlds presented in the ancient novels are conscious constructs that can be read as intentionally fictional—as explorations of reality, in other words, whether for the purpose of criticism or idealization through manipulation and distortion.

We invite abstracts for papers that investigate these broad themes in social history and literary production while focusing on one or more of the following topics: urban and rural landscapes; ritual and sanctuaries; elite and non-elite status; education; slavery; social organization, gender, and kinship; material manifestations of texts (inscriptions and papyri); athletic competition; spectacle and its local contexts; doctors and medicine; and law and order. Papers should seek not merely to catalog how the texts straightforwardly portray features of provincial life, but analyze how these elements are part of a literary and ideological construction that can be contextualized through reference to the real world or representations of it. Another approach that would be welcome is the appraisal of how recent scholarship has developed techniques for performing such analyses.

The panel will include a brief introduction and a formal response by the organizers, but the intent is to leave sufficient time for a general discussion with the audience.

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous abstract of 500 to 800 words for a paper suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation as a PDF attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Be sure to mention the title of the panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously.

 

 

 

CALLS FOR ABSTRACTS FOR AFFILIATED GROUPS

An affiliated group is a group having an organizational structure independent of the APA. The affiliated group has a common purpose and/or scholarly interest, usually representing a special field or ancillary discipline. Affiliated groups maintain membership lists, and the majority charge dues and circulate newsletters. Affiliated groups are chartered for five-year periods for participation in the APA/AIA Joint Annual Meeting. Each Category II Affiliated Group is authorized to issue a Call for Papers and to take responsibility for the selection of abstracts and discussants. Abstracts for affiliated group panels are submitted directly to the designated organizers. Members wishing to present a paper in a panel organized by an affiliated group must have paid APA membership dues for 2011. A presenter who is responding to a call for abstracts from an affiliated group is not eligible for a waiver of the membership requirement. If a member's paper is accepted for an Affiliated Group Panel, that member may not submit another abstract for consideration by the Program Committee for a regular paper session.

Panel organizers have the right to cancel their panels if the abstract submissions received are, in their judgment, insufficient in number, quality, or relevance to constitute a valid panel. Please note: The panel must be canceled if the organizers receive fewer than 4 abstracts for consideration or accept fewer than 3. Only papers submitted anonymously by the announced deadline and accepted through a process of anonymous review may be presented. Although the organizers may appoint presiders and discussants/respondents for their sessions, invited talks are not permitted. Reviewers and organizers may not present papers although they may serve as discussants/respondents. Each reviewer appointed by the organizer(s) must review every abstract submitted for the session.


Neo-Latin Studies: Current Research
Sponsored by the American Association for Neo-Latin Studies (AANLS)
Organized by Diane Johnson, Western Washington University

The AANLS invites proposals for a panel of papers on current research in Neo-Latin Studies to be held at the meeting of the American Philological Association (APA) in Philadelphia in January, 2012. Our intent is to illustrate the diversity and richness of these studies and to underscore the importance of research concerning the complex international phenomenon of Neo-Latin literature.

We welcome papers on all aspects of the study of literary, historical, technical, and scholarly works written in Latin in the Renaissance and early Modern Period (to about 1800). We will also consider proposals dealing with more recent Neo-Latin.

Abstracts should be sent by e-mail attachment to Professor Johnson at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. or by mail to Professor Diane Johnson, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Western Washington University, MS 9057, Bellingham, WA 98225-9057 U.S.A. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 15, 2011. Abstracts should be only one page in length.

In accordance with APA regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by three readers. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the APA website. In your cover letter or e-mail, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing, with dues paid through 2011.


Roman Comedy in the Classroom
Sponsored by the American Classical League and organized by Timothy Moore,
University of Texas, Austin and Mary C. English, Montclair State University

The American Classical League invites scholars and teachers with an interest in Roman Comedy to submit abstracts for its panel session at the Philadelphia Meeting of the American Philological Association in 2012. We are interested both in how instructors have taught the plays of Plautus and Terence at all levels, in Latin and in translation, and how they have used Roman comedy as a tool for teaching Latin, Roman social history, and other topics. Among the areas that might be addressed are how to overcome the perceived difficulty of Roman comedy's language and meter, how the perspectives of current scholarship on Roman comedy can contribute to pedagogy, the incorporation of performance, use of modern adaptations of the plays, and how analogies between Roman comedy and contemporary drama can engage today's students.

Abstracts should be submitted to Mary C. English, Dept. of Classics, Montclair State University, Montclair NJ 07043, ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) and should be only one page in length. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Feb. 28, 2011.


Bilingual Inscriptions and Cultural Interaction in the Greco-Roman World
American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy
Organized by Nora Dimitrova, Stephen V. Tracy, and Paul Iversen

Bilingual inscriptions are among the most exciting archaeological discoveries in the complex crossroads of civilizations and ethnicities that constituted the Greco-Roman world. Bilingual inscriptions can help decipher a new language and are of particular importance in reconstructing various aspects of cultural interaction—from personal expressions of religious worship or metrical epitaphs to official documents published throughout the Roman Empire. They reveal which language was better known in a certain community, the level of literacy in different social strata, the terminology of public administration, the specifics of local idiom, and many other facets of cultural history.

The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy welcomes papers that discuss bilingual inscriptions in the Greco-Roman world. We are interested in selecting a group of papers that treat a broad variety of topics and exemplify the interdisciplinary nature of epigraphy.

Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE and should not be longer than one page. Please follow the directions for Individual Abstracts Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the APA website.. The abstracts themselves should be sent electronically as a MS Word document to: Nora Dimitrova, Vice-President, ASGLE at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . All Greek should either be transliterated or employ a Unicode font. The deadline is February 1, 2011.


Culture and Society in Greek, Roman, and Early Byzantine Egypt

Sponsored by the American Society of Papyrologists

The American Society of Papyrologists invites proposals for papers for a panel on “Culture and Society in Greek, Roman, and Early Byzantine Egypt” for the 2012 APA January 5-8 in Philadelphia, PA. Submissions for this panel must meet at least one of the following criteria:

(a) they must make use of evidence for ancient cultures and literatures preserved in papyri, ostraca, or wooden tablets (in Greek, Latin, Coptic, Demotic, Arabic, or other appropriate languages);

(b) they must investigate aspects of the history, cultures, textual productions, or material culture of Egypt from the Hellenistic to the early Arab period.

Submissions from scholars at both junior and senior levels are welcome. Prospective speakers must be members in good standing of the APA.

Please send abstracts to Raffaella Cribiore, Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. by February 20, 2011. Abstracts should not exceed 600 words (one single-spaced page) and should not include the author's name to ensure anonymous referral.

If sent by regular mail, abstracts should be postmarked by February 20, 2011 and addressed to: Raffaella Cribiore, New York University, Department of Classics, 100 Washington Square East, Silver Center, room 503L, New York, N.Y. 10003.


The Next Generation: Papers by Undergraduate Classics Students
Sponsored by Eta Sigma Phi
Organized by Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College

Eta Sigma Phi, founded in 1914 at the University of Chicago, is a national classics honorary society for students of Latin and/or Greek who attend accredited liberal arts colleges and universities in the United States.

The society is sponsoring this panel in order to showcase the scholarship of undergraduate classics students. Papers may deal with any aspect of the ancient Greek and Roman world (e.g., language, literature, art, history, religion, philosophy) or with the reception of classical culture in modern times. An established scholar will be invited to serve as respondent to the student papers.

Eta Sigma Phi hopes that this panel will serve as a bridge between undergraduate students and the American Philological Association, not just by giving the students an opportunity to experience an APA meeting and to share their views with professional classicists, but also by introducing those professionals to some of the most talented and promising students from the next generation of classicists.

Any student enrolled full-time in an undergraduate program at a college or university during the academic year 2010-2011 is eligible to submit a paper. Anyone interested in proposing a paper for the panel should e-mail the entire paper as a .pdf attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . The paper must be able to be read aloud at a moderate pace in 15 minutes (or 20 minutes if audio-visual equipment is used), so it should be no longer than 10 double-spaced pages, excluding any endnotes and bibliography. Please also e-mail a one-page abstract of the paper, and a cover page listing name, school, school address, telephone, e-mail address, and audio-visual needs. To preserve anonymity in the evaluation process, the student's name and school affiliation should appear only on the cover page, not on the abstract or the paper itself. The receipt deadline for the paper, abstract, and cover page is February 1, 2011.

Each submission will be evaluated anonymously by three referees. Students who submit papers for the panel must be current members of the APA. Please direct questions to the Executive Secretary of Eta Sigma Phi, Professor Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Department of Classics, Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 61462 ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ; 309-457-2371).


Gods and Coins
Sponsored by the Friends of Numismatics
Organized by William E. Metcalf, Department of Classics, Yale University and Department of Coins and Medals, Yale University Art Gallery.

The Friends of Numismatics invites submissions for the 2012 American Philological Association/Archaeological Institute of America Annual meeting, January 5-8, 2012, in Philadephia, Pennsylvania, on the topic of Gods and Coins.

Papers should address the role played by coinage in propagating the religious values of the Roman state and its rulers. Did this function of the coinage change or develop in innovative ways with the advent of new religious beliefs, for example Commodus' self-association with Hercules or Constantine's adoption of Christianity?

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Jane Miller, Department of Coins and Medals, Yale University Art Gallery, P. O. Box 208271, New Haven, CT 06520-8271. Phone: 203-432-1801, fax; 203-432-6019; Email jane.miller@yale.eduby February 15, 2010. Papers will be evaluated anonymously by at least two reviewers. All persons who submit abstracts must be APA members in good standing.


Plutarch and the Athenian Statesman
Sponsored by the International Plutarch Society
Organized by Jeffrey Beneker, University of Wisconsin

Plutarch of Chaeronia had a personal connection to Athens during his lifetime, but he was also thoroughly immersed in the historical, literary, and philosophical traditions of the city's past. Although undoubtedly a lover of Athenian art and wisdom, he appears to have had a special fascination with the careers and character of the statesmen from Athens' Archaic and Classical periods. For instance, of his twenty-three extant Greek Lives, ten have Athenian subjects, ranging from the legendary Theseus to Phocion, a contemporary of Alexander; figures such as Themistocles and Pericles feature prominently in the Moralia, not only in the political essays, but also in treatises on ethics, religion, and philosophy; and he made the argument (though perhaps only rhetorically) that the tragedians had not benefitted Athens with their plays as much as the statesmen had by providing walls, securing liberty, and establishing an empire (On the Fame of the Athenians 348d).

The aim of this panel is to explore Plutarch's characterization of Athenian statesmen and especially his use of these historical figures as exempla. We welcome submissions on Plutarch's interpretation of historical material, but we are particularly interested in papers that examine how he represents the intersection of character and leadership in Athenian politics, how he shapes his biographical narratives to make moral or other kinds of arguments, and how he employs Athenian political and military leaders in his non-biographical works.

Abstracts should be sent electronically, in MS Word format or PDF, to Jeffrey Beneker ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ). In preparing the abstract, please follow the formatting guidelines for individual abstracts that appear on the APA website, and plan for a paper that takes no more than 20 minutes to deliver. Abstracts will be judged anonymously. Membership in the International Plutarch Society is not required for participation in this panel. The deadline is February 1, 2011.


Continuity and Change in the Transition from Middle- to Neo-Platonism

Sponsored by the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies
Organizer: John F. Finamore (University of Iowa)

After Plato's death, Platonism continued to exist, evolve, and thrive. By the 1st Century C.E., Middle-Platonists were reading and interpreting the Platonic dialogues, creating a new and vibrant system of ideas. Although no two Middle-Platonic authors agreed completely with any other, a pattern emerged that from the time of Plotinus became more standardized and after Iamblichus became the dominant philosophy in the Empire. In this panel, we propose to explore the evolution from Middle Platonism to Neoplatonism. We welcome papers on any aspect of these philosophies, including such topics as the evolution of Platonic ethics, psychology, or metaphysics in this time period.

Abstracts of 500-800 words should be sent as email attachments to John Finamore ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) no later than February 1, 2011. The author's name should not appear in the abstract. Please follow the formatting guidelines for individual abstracts that appear on the APA website, and plan for a paper that takes no more than 20 minutes to deliver. All abstracts will be judged anonymously. The panel organizer will subsequently contact those who have written abstracts and provide comments from the reviewers.


Getting What You Want: Queering Ancient Courtship
Sponsored by the Lambda Classical Caucus
Organized by H. Christian Blood (UC Santa Cruz) and John P. Wood (UNC Greensboro)

It has long been supposed that understanding same-sex acts and identities would shed light on Greco-Roman sex, but less attention has been given to the queer content and possibilities that anticipate the act. Understood as the plurality of behaviors, conventions, and signifiers mobilized to get people together, courtship had value beyond erotic situations for forging alliances, conserving property, attaining upward mobility—and for getting what you want. Courtship, then, would seem inherently heterosexual, serving and preserving individuals as well as social entities. Yet, for every Kallirhoe, there is a Pergamine Boy, and for every Orpheus and Eurydice, there is Socrates and Alcibiades. Some readings of ancient texts lampoon the heterosexual social institution of courtship, and this panel seeks to explore how disruptive, subversive, and comedic to established protocol these representations may have been.

Following David Halperin's formulations, we understand “queer” broadly: as a strategic practice
And practical strategy that refutes heteronormative logic, as a privileged site for the criticism and analysis of cultural discourses, which, lacking an essence of its own, acquires meaning from its oppositional relation to the norm (Saint Foucault, 60-62). Questions that individual papers might address include but are not limited to the following:


* What are the power dynamics of same-sex courtship? Is it more egalitarian than its heterosexual counterpart?
* what are the public and private parameters of courtship, and how are they interrelated?
* What disciplinary and interpretive tools (e.g., archaeology, anthropology, feminist theory, queer theory, psychoanalysis, religious studies, etc.) are well-suited to queering courtship?
* How did traditions of courtship differ for same-sex couples, or in what ways did same-sex couples insert themselves into heterosexual courtship behaviors from which they were excluded?
* How might queer perspectives illuminate heterosexual narratives, such as Greek Romance?
* How do courtship stories reflect cultural norms as they move, e.g. East to West, pastoral to urban?
* What new light might queer approaches shed on familiar but non-normative heterosexual configurations—such as Jocasta & Oedipus, Phaedra & Hippolytus, or Lucius & the Corinthian Matrona?
* Can a queering of courtship recuperate problematic female figures from antiquity, such as Clodia? Given the overall suspicion of female erotic agency, how can we recover the evidence for, and significance of, courtship by women, whether of other women or of men?
* What are the challenges, and benefits, of incorporating queer approaches in the classroom?
* In the end, how can we tell whether, and how, all parties get what they want?

One page proposals, due by February 5, 2011, should be anonymous and adhere to APA guidelines for formatting abstracts. Please send submissions, as attached word documents, to Mary-Kay Gamel ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ). They will be anonymously refereed. Questions may be addressed to the panel organizers ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. or Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ).


The Influence of Classical Latin Poetry on Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages
Sponsored by the Medieval Latin Studies Group
Organized by Frank T. Coulson, The Ohio State University

This panel seeks to investigate the multiple ways in which the poetry of Ovid, Virgil, Statius, Lucan and others influenced and informed the writers of late antiquity and the Middle Ages. The question of influence is to be construed widely and may include such broad topics as direct borrowings and influence; freer adaptations of classical poetry, and rhetorical exercises which borrowed from classical originals.

For more information, please contact the panel organizer, Frank T. Coulson, at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Abstracts (500-800 words) should be sent by February 1, 2011 to
Frank T. Coulson, 190 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus OH 43210, or via e-mail to: Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. .

Ancient Greek Philosophy
Sponsored by the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy (SAGP) solicits abstracts/papers proposed for presentation at its meeting with the American Philological Association at its January 2012 Annual Meeting. Papers must be prepared for blind review and submitted to Anthony Preus (Secretary of SAGP), Philosophy, Binghamton University, Binghamton NY 13902-6000, by January 9, 2011. The Program Committee requests submissions between 1000 (minimum) and 3000 (maximum) words. Submissions by attachment to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. are welcome. We welcome submissions on any subject in Ancient Greek Philosophy. Submissions may be submitted for either the American Philological Association meeting or the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division meeting; in your cover message let us know your preferences concerning venue. We prefer attachments in Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rtf) rather than other word processing systems, since it makes it easier to forward the submissions for review. Thank you!


Sex, Reproduction, and Medicine
Sponsored by the Society for Ancient Medicine and Pharmacy

At the 2012 meeting of the American Philological Association, to be held January 5-8 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Society for Ancient Medicine and Pharmacy (SAM) will sponsor a panel featuring recent research on ‘Sex, Reproduction, and Medicine'. We are interested in papers treating any aspect of this topic in antiquity, including, for example, medical and philosophical understandings of the physiology of sex and reproduction, practical measures to encourage or avoid fertility and offspring, and the social and ethical dimensions of medical discourse and action around sexuality and generation.

Please send a summary of your proposed paper to Dr. Rebecca Flemming. It should be 500-600 words, and arrive by February 1, 2011. If possible, please submit it electronically to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . If that is not feasible, mail it to Dr. Flemming at: Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge , CB3 9DA , UK.


The Book and The Rock: Textual And Material Evidence In The Study Of Ancient Religion
Sponsored by the Society For Ancient Mediterranean Religions

The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions (SAMR) invites scholars and students of the religions of the ancient Mediterranean world, including Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Near Eastern and Anatolian religions, as well as early Christianity and Judaism, to submit abstracts for its panel session at the Philadelphia meeting of the American Philological Association in 2012.

The study of the religions of the Ancient Mediterranean has always relied heavily on textual evidence--histories, literature, inscriptions -- sometimes to the point of exclusion of archaeological evidence. There can be little doubt that this textual focus has a distorting effect on our understanding of the religious phenomena we study; the question is to understand the types and extent of these limitations and distortions. To this end, we seek papers that address occasions where an emphasis on written evidence might have led us to understand a religious phenomenon in one way that was subsequently modified, enlarged or overturned by archaeological evidence. For example, archaeological evidence from Volsinii seems to conflict with Livy and the well-known Senatus Consultum de Bacchanalibus of 186 BC, archaeology indicating a longstanding tradition of the cult where literary sources imply its recent introduction. Papers should treat concrete examples of such cases, while raising methodological issues about consonance, conflict, and complementarity where different types of evidence are concerned.

Abstracts should be submitted by email attachment as .doc or .rtf files to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. and should be from 500-600 words in length for a paper to last between 15 to 20 minutes. Abstracts should contain a title and a word count, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. For further information about abstract format, please see the APA website. All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously by a committee of SAMR. The deadline for submission of abstracts is February 15, 2011. For further information, please contact Barbette Spaeth, Department of Classical Studies, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) or Eric Orlin, Department of Classics, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416 ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ).


Asceticism and Monasticism in Late Antiquity
Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity
Organized by Richard Westall, Pontificia Università Gregoriana

Some four decades have passed since the publication of D.J. Chitty's book The Desert a City (1966) and the appearance of Peter Brown's essay “The Rise and Function of the Holy Man in Late Antiquity” (1971). Markedly different in approach and treatment of the same subject, each is a classic in its own right and together they have stimulated a large and variegated literature on the subject. There have appeared numerous detailed treatments of individual subjects in history and literature (e.g. Rousseau, Pachomius [1985]) and archaeology and art (e.g. Hirschfeld, Judean Desert Monasteries [1992]) as well as the occasional work of synthesis (e.g. de Vogüé, Histoire littéraire du mouvement monastique dans l'Antiquité [1991, 1993, 1996]). However, in recent decades, work progresses largely upon an individual basis and panels or conferences dedicated to the subject of ascetism and monasticism in Late Antiquity have been infrequent. Nevertheless, advancing our knowledge in discrete sectors and providing various points of departure for the creation of yet new paradigms, such work has set in motion a quiet revolution in historiographical approaches to Late Antique ascetism and monasticism.

Shifting paradigms suggest new questions and innovative approaches to an ever-increasing body of textual evidence and material culture. For example, letters attributed to Antony of Egypt pose the question of the influence of neo-Pythagorean thought upon the development of Christian monasticism. Conversely, as can be seen from the case of the emperor Julian, there is the question of those ways in which Christianity influenced ascetic practices amongst philosophers and pagans in general. What, indeed, was the material influence exerted by these practitioners of spiritual perfection upon the masses who constituted the society from which they came? The relevance of monasticism to the theological views of the Jerusalem patriarch Sophronius is well attested, but in what ways might his monastic past have manifested itself within the physical setting and daily life of the church that he led? Or, to turn to such diverse individuals as Jerome, Cassiodorus, and Benedict and to use new evidence in addressing an old question, how might monasteries serve as vectors of culture, linking the disparate parts of the Mediterranean world at the very moment of its dissolution?

The Society for Late Antiquity invites submissions of abstracts for papers addressing these or similar questions in a manner aimed at stimulating new approaches. Papers concerned with textual or material evidence or with both are welcome. One-page abstracts of papers (no more than 500 words) requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 1, 2011 to Richard Westall via either email ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) or surface mail (Richard Westall, Pontificia Università Gregoriana, Facoltà di Storia e Beni Culturali della Chiesa, Piazza della Pilotta 4, 00187 Roma ITALY). Please follow the APA's instructions for the format of individual abstracts. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees.


Happy Talk: Diversity of Speech in Greco-Roman Comedy
Sponsored by the Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature
Organized by Andrew S. Becker and Jerise Fogel

This panel will examine linguistic diversification in Greek and Roman comedy, including dialect, socio-politically differentiated speech, ethnic language, obscenity, tragicomic or parodic diction, musical and metrical variations, gendered speech, syntactical variation, or generic play.

The study of language and linguistic turns in Greek and Roman comedy has been flourishing in the past decade (e.g., the work of Colvin and Willi). Scholarly work on orality and written discourse has also been a fertile seedbed, including but not limited to the use of conventions from mime, tragedy, and Homeric diction (e.g., Slings on comic imitation of vernacular speech and poetic modes). Perhaps the most fertile source of the energy in the study of the representation of language in Greek and Roman comedy has
been the growing interest among classicists in the broader cultural contexts within which the Greeks and Romans worked, played, wrote, and responded to dramatic performances. We hope to solicit new contributions to these (and other) areas of research from scholars interested in exploring linguistic aspects of comedy, with a particular emphasis on the spoken joke, word choice, expression of dialect in the Greek or Latin language, and the use of speech to differentiate characters with respect to, e.g., class, gender, ethnicity, status, or age.

Presenters are asked to support, illustrate, and enliven their papers by performing orally their chosen ancient text or texts.

Abstracts should be sent as attachments to bothAndrew S. Becker (Virginia Tech, Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) and Chris Ann Matteo (Stone Bridge High School, Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ) by February 15, 2010. Abstracts must be no more than one page and contain no indication of authorship. In accordance with APA regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by three outside readers. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the APA website.


Greek and Latin Languages and Linguistics
Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Greek and Latin Languages and Linguistics
Organized by Jeremy Rau, Harvard University and Benjamin W. Fortson, University of Michigan

The Society for the Study of Greek and Latin Languages and Linguistics solicits submission of abstracts for its panel session at the 143rd meeting of the American Philological Association in 2012. Papers treating any topic in Greek or Latin language and linguistics will be considered for presentation. Abstracts will be evaluated on the basis of merit and relevance to the field. Each panelist will be given 15 minutes for presentation of his/her paper, to be followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Abstracts should be one page in length and should conform to the formatting guidelines listed on the APA web site. Please send three copies of the abstract by February 15, 2011 to Jeremy Rau, Department of the Classics, Boylston 2nd fl., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138.


Approaches to Teaching Vergil
Sponsored by the Vergilian Society

Ever since the days of the Roman Empire, Vergil's poetry has stood at the center of the western educational tradition. Originally taught as a model of Latin style, Vergil has retained his place in the Latin language curriculum, often serving today as the first, or one of the first, authors read by a student at the intermediate level. But increasingly access to Vergil's poetry comes through translation, as Vergil has migrated into courses in Roman civilization, world literature, and great books sequences and into specialized offerings like gender studies.

Each of these classroom situations poses its own special set of challenges. If Vergil is to be taught in a language class, how does one balance the need to ‘get through the text' against the desire to appreciate the poetry as poetry? If the material is to be taught in translation, how does one balance Vergil's Romanness against the qualities in his poetry that can remain meaningful to students who are farther and farther removed from the world in which the poetry was written? If Vergil is to be studied for his views on gender, how does one balance the attitudes prevalent in ancient Rome against those our students bring to the classroom?

The Vergilian Society invites papers on the topic “Approaches to Teaching Vergil.” The title of the session is adapted from the essay collection on teaching the Aeneid that William Anderson and Lorina Quartarone published in the Modern Language Association's Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. The 2012 APA meeting marks the tenth anniversary of the publication of this book, which is enough time to step back and consider what has been done since then.

Proposals are solicited for papers on teaching the Eclogues, the Georgics, or the Aeneid, in the original or in translation. We are particularly interested in ways in which research and scholarship can enrich teaching, but the focus of the proposal should remain the classroom. Possible topics include, but are by no means limited to, theoretical approaches like narratology and reception studies, engaging themes like victimhood and heroism, connections to other disciplines like history and religion, and so forth. Papers that connect Vergil to the teaching of later literature are also welcome. Please send abstracts of 500 to 800 words, for a 15-20 minute presentation, by email to Craig Kallendorf at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . Professor Kallendorf can also be contacted at the Department of European and Classical Languages, Texas A&M University, MS 4215, College Station, Texas, 77843-4215, phone: 979-845-2124. Since all abstracts will be judged anonymously in accordance with APA policies, please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. All proposals must be received by February 1, 2011.


Women and War
Sponsored by the Women's Classical Caucus
Organized by Karen Bassi and Chris Ann Matteo

The Women's Classical Caucus invites proposals for a panel session on Women and War to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association in Philadelphia in 2012.

In the ancient Mediterranean world -- as in other historical contexts -- women have been both the putative causes of war and its most constant victims. From Helen and Lavinia to Cloelia and Boudicca our sources provide numerous examples of women as figures for both justifying and condemning war, whether as actors or sufferers. The WCC invites papers that explore the relationship between women and the causes, contingencies, and consequences of military conflict in the literary and material culture of the Greco-Roman/ancient Mediterranean world, in the light of any methodological and theoretical perspective.

At a time when the United States is engaged in wars on two fronts and when the rhetoric of war includes appeals to terrorism, nationalism, religious belief, and cultural exceptionalism, the rich and varied ancient record of women's roles in war appears all the more relevant and illuminating. We invite comparative historical, geo-political, and cultural/literary approaches to the topic. Proposed papers may consider 'war' in all its varied lexical forms, and in both its literal and metaphorical uses. Subjects may include (but are not limited to): women as warriors; war, women, and myth; women and the legal discourse of war; the militarized body; war crimes against women; the gendering of aggression; women in the context of foreign, civil, and/or domestic wars; women, kinship, and warfare.

Abstracts of 500 to 800 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment (Word doc or pdf) to: Susanna Braund at Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. . You may also send submissions by regular mail: Susanna Braund, Professor of Latin Poetry and its Reception (Canada Research Chair), Dept of Classical, Near Eastern & Religious Studies, UBC, Buchanan C, 1866 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 Canada.

All abstracts will be judged anonymously. Please do not identify yourself in any way in the abstract itself. All proposals must be received by February 1, 2011.


Contact : Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir.

Source : Site de l'APA

 

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