And Now for Something Completely Different: Transformation and Transcendence in Antiquity

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And Now for Something Completely Different: Transformation and Transcendence in Antiquity

University of Wisconsin-Madison Classics Graduate Colloquium

Appel à contributions

 

Madison, WI; October 5-6, 2012

For the ancients, change defined the human condition, so it is unsurprising to find altered states as a pervasive theme in depictions of humans and their world. Be it corporeal or psychological, political or spiritual, individual or collective, change is inevitable. But who or what initiates the process of change and determines its course? What are the repercussions, and how far do they reach? Divine ecstasy produced unfathomable behavior when Agave participated in the murder of her own son, but according to Plato's Ion, inspiration was also the source of beautiful poetry. Tiresias learned first-hand that physical transformations were not necessarily permanent, and late 5th-century Athens experienced a similar instability in the political realm through revolution and counter-revolution. Meanwhile, the entire mythological/ historical tradition was itself in flux, as competing versions of the past continually reworked the narrative landscape. Just as the “facts” of the Pelops myth could be challenged by Pindar, so too could the memory of certain Roman emperors be erased through damnatio memoriae.
We invite papers from current graduate students on topics concerning altered states or the concept of change itself. Examples include:

Corporeal: metamorphosis, shape-shifting, disguise
Psychological: insanity, intoxication and drug use, dreams and visions
Divine: prophetic or poetic inspiration, religious ecstasy, apotheosis
Political: revolution and regime change, colonization
Environmental: natural disasters, landscape development and building projects
Material: graffiti, palimpsests, destruction or alteration of works of art

These are only a few examples and are not meant to exhaust the possible topics that would fit under our theme. We welcome papers from any discipline (history, philology, philosophy, material culture, etc.) and any era of the Greco-Roman world.

The keynote address will be delivered by Stephen Hinds (University of Washington).

Graduate students wishing to present a paper at the colloquium should submit a titled abstract of no more than 300 words to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. by April 15, 2012. Please include the following on a separate page sent with the abstract: name, the title of the paper, email address, institution, city, state, and country. Papers should be 15 minutes in length. Notifications may be expected around the end of May. Please direct any questions about the colloquium to Josh Smith ( Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. ).

 

Source : Site de l'APA

 

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