T. H. Carpenter, K. M. Lynch, E. G. D. Robinson, The Italic People of Ancient Apulia. New Evidence from Pottery for Workshops, Markets, and Customs

Samedi, 20 Décembre 2014 00:00 Renaud Alexandre
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T. H. Carpenter, K. M. Lynch, E. G. D. Robinson (éd.), The Italic People of Ancient Apulia. New Evidence from Pottery for Workshops, Markets, and Customs, Cambridge, 2014.

Éditeur : Cambridge University Press
369 pages
ISBN : 9781107041868
$125

The focus of this book is on the Italic people of Apulia during the fourth century B.C., when Italic culture seems to have reached its peak of affluence. Scholars have largely ignored these people and the region they inhabited. During the past several decades archaeologists have made significant progress in revealing the cultures of Apulia through excavations of habitation sites and un-plundered tombs, often published in Italian journals. This book makes the broad range of recent scholarship – from new excavations and contexts to archaeometric testing of production hypotheses to archaeological evidence for reconsidering painter attributions – available to English-speaking audiences. In it thirteen scholars from Italy, the United States, Great Britain, France, and Australia present targeted essays on aspects of the cultures of the Italic people of Apulia during the fourth century BC and the surrounding decades.


Table of Contents

Part I. General Introduction
Part II. Time and Place: History and Geography:
1. Pots, peoples, and places in fourth-century Apulia Alastair Small
2. Iapygians: the indigenous populations of ancient Puglia in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE Mario Lombardo
Part III. Pottery Production: Red-Figure Workshops:
3. Production and functions of Apulian red-figure pottery in Taras: new contexts and problems of interpretation Didier Fontannaz
4. Red-figure vases from Metapontion: the evidence from the necropoleis along the coast road Francesca Silvestrelli
5. Hands working in Magna Graecia: the Amykos Painter and his workshop Martine Denoyelle
Part IV. Pottery in Context: Italic Sites:
6. Apulian and Lucanian pottery from coastal Peucetian contexts Ada Riccardi
7. The diffusion of middle and late Apulian vases in Peucetian funerary contexts: a comparison of several necropoleis Angela Ciancio
8. Red-figure vases from elite contexts in the city of Canusium, Apulia: a selection of images and repertoires of the first half of the fourth century BCE Marisa Corrente
9. Apulian pottery in Messapian contexts Maria Teresa Giannotta
Part V. Pottery Interpreted: Approaches to Pottery Studies:
10. Native shapes in Southern Italian red-figure pottery Fabio Colivicchi
11. Archeometric analysis of Apulian and Lucanian red-figure pottery E. G. D. Robinson
12. A case for Greek tragedy in Italic settlements in the fourth century BCE T. H. Carpenter
Part VI. Pottery as Art: Collections:
13. Apulian and Lucanian red-figure pottery in eighteenth-century collections Maria Emilia Masci.

 

Source : Cambridge University Press