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Evénement 

Titre:
Textual Scholarship from Antiquity to the Renaissance
Quand:
02.07.2012 - 06.07.2012 
Où:
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven - Louvain (Leuven)
Catégorie:
Divers

Description

Information signalée par Marie-Karine Lhommé

 

Textual Scholarship from Antiquity to the Renaissance

LECTIO Summer School

 

KU Leuven, 2-6 July 2012

LECTIO, the Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, organizes its first Summer School. It takes place at KU Leuven, situated at the centre of the lively historical town of Leuven.
For five days, participants in the Summer School will immerse themselves in the world of ancient, medieval and renaissance scholars, and their Latin, Greek and vernacular texts. These authors and texts will be discussed from different perspectives and disciplines in both lectures and more practical sessions. For some sessions a (short) reading list will be provided. The Summer School also offers an occasion for participants to present and discuss their own research.

The Summer School is particularly intended for (research) master students and PhD students. Other participants are welcome to attend. The number of participants is limited to 20.

Price: € 250. Includes coffee breaks, lunches, a drinks reception, the concluding dinner, lecturers' expenses and charges for the use of the classrooms.
Accommodation is not included. We have an option on rooms in Guesthouse De Viking (Noormannenstraat 68, 3000 Leuven) (approx. € 21/night). Do let us know if you need a room and we will confirm it for you. It is recommended to register as early as possible when you need accommodation, because some of our options expire in April.

Registration: You can register for this Summer School by sending an email to Cette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir. before 31 May 2012. Mention your name, address, nationality and date and place of birth. Attach a short curriculum vitae, and, if possible, a short description of your current research. Please indicate also whether you would like to present your research during the Summer School. If you need accommodation, mention the nights during which you would like to stay in the Guesthouse. We will then send you the instructions for payment. The account number is BE60 7340 0666 0370 (KU Leuven), please mention the reference 400/0006/87224.

Organization: LECTIO (http://ghum.kuleuven.be/lectio/); organizers: Pieter De Leemans and An Faems. With the generous support of the Leuven International Doctoral School for the Humanities and Social Sciences.


More information about the individual sessions:

Tara Andrews & Shari Boodts
Stemmatology
We will provide a short theoretical introduction on classic and computerized stemmatology, adjusted to the level of experience of the participants. We will then divide the group in two, based on the specific domains, interests and problems put forth by the participants. In the two separate sessions the participants will go through all the steps in building a classic or a computerized stemma. There will also be time to address the specific challenges posed by the respective projects of the participants.

Pieter Beullens & Griet Galle
Vetus or nova? Case studies from the 12th- and 13th-century Aristoteles Latinus
The aim of this session is to present some challenges editors of medieval Aristotle translations have to face. Which “correct” reading is presented in the edition if the translator did not intend to make a final choice? How do you approach the tradition of a text based on 23 stemmata codicum? And how do you assess the accuracy of a translation when the original Greek text is lost? (Pieter Beullens)
About fourteen manuscripts of the (Greek-Latin) translatio vetus of Aristotle's De sensu contain a corpus of marginal and interlinear scholarly glosses on this work. These notes most probably originated in the Oxford schools around the middle of the 13th century. This session will focus on problems with respect to the edition of the ‘Oxford gloss' on chapter 1 of De sensu. It will also refer to difficulties related to the edition of Adam of Buckfield's commentary on De sensu, of which the first version is the main source of the ‘Oxford Gloss'. (Griet Galle)

Geert Claassens
‘Magister' Maerlant
Jacob van Maerlant, probably the most prolific poet of the Middle Dutch period, wasn't trained at a medieval university. But he most certainly was well educated and fluent in Latin and French (besides his mother tongue, of course). When one would call him a ‘magister' it is not because he was entitled to, but because of his purpose and point of view in his writings. This session will show his didactic aims by looking at the way Maerlant treated his Latin and French sources, which reveals first and foremost his critical attitude as an historian.

Jeroen De Keyser
The transmission of Ciceronian speeches in the fifteenth century: a case study
Editors of Cicero's Pro Archia have assumed that Petrarch's lost transcription of the equally lost Liège manuscript that he discovered in 1333 survives in an almost unaltered version in a single Florentine manuscript, while the more than 260 remaining 14th and mainly 15th century manuscripts from Italian origin allegedly reflect another stage of the text, incorporating Petrarch's conjectural corrections. All modern editions rely on three more primitive Northern European manuscripts and on Petrarch's lost copy – the reconstruction of which has been based, however, on less than a dozen rather randomly selected witnesses. This workshop will show how a more comprehensive study of the prolific Italian 15th-century transmission can produce a better-founded text, challenging the existing stemma. It will more specifically focus on strategies in coping with a sprawling and heavily contaminated transmission.

Pieter De Leemans
Alia translatio planior... Scholarly Attitudes of Medieval Translators of and Commentators on Aristotle
In the first part of this seminar we will examine to what extent the medieval translators who rendered the Corpus Aristotelicum from Greek into Latin (among whom James of Venice, Robert Grosseteste, Bartholomew of Messina, William of Moerbeke) critically assess their Greek sources and develop methodologies to offer an intelligible translation of the Aristotelian text.
In the second part, we will turn towards medieval scholars, such as Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas and Pietro d'Abano, who used and commented on these translations. We will investigate the problems they faced in reading these texts and the strategies they developed to, on the one hand, offer a plausible interpretation of them and, on the other, respect the authority of the Philosopher.

Michèle Goyens
Editing an autograph: methodology and challenges
Medieval autographs are not so rare: at the courts of Charles V and the dukes of Burgundy, there were several authors who also transcribed their texts. In this class, the focus will be on autographs which represent “work in progress”: not beautifully manufactured manuscripts, but drafts that allow to see how the author worked, how he thought in order to create his text. One text in particular will be analysed: the autograph manuscript of the ‘Problemes' by Evrart de Conty, a probably second draft of his Middle French translation of Aristotle's ‘Problemata', written c. 1380. As to the methodology, we will address topics as genetic criticism, used for Modern authors, in order to find out if the methods used in this respect are applicable to medieval authorship, as well as problems related to the edition of such autographs.

Caroline Macé & Erika Gielen
Manuscripts behind school walls: textual scholarship and education in Late-Byzantium
Throughout the Byzantine period, higher education mainly followed the traditional lines, started already in Antiquity. The textbooks that were used, were selected or compiled from among those works that were in general considered as the best classical and post-classical accounts on a given topic. Therefore, the preservation and reproduction of such works was of major importance for teaching (both public and private study). The cultural collapse that went with the Fourth Crusade in the beginning of the 13th century, urged scholars in the late-Byzantine period to search for, rediscover, reproduce and rework those classical works, so to create a new corpus of scholarly texts. In this session, we would like to highlight some aspects of this process of textual scholarship in Late Byzantium, by focusing on the editorial and scholarly activities of two major representatives of this period, Nicephorus Blemmydes (1197 - ca. 1269) and George Pachymeres (1242 - ca. 1310). The latter will serve as a case study of the first step of the process, the gathering and editing of texts, by studying in particular manuscript Parisinus gr. 1810, Pachymeres' autograph copy of the In Parmenidem of the 5th-century Neo-Platonist Proclus. An analysis of the Epitome physica of Nicephorus Blemmydes will illustrate step 2, the composition of an own manual for teaching purposes based on previous, collected sources.

Jan Papy
Renaissance Philology: Textual Scholarship and Divination in Erasmus and Lipsius
If modern philology evolved towards a more technical knowledge of manuscripts, invoking manuscript evidence and palaeographical testimony as the very basis of critical editions of ancient texts, humanist scholars operated in a different way. As mobility was limited and the exchange of knowledge of manuscript readings was not as it was today, humanist scholars had to rely on their knowledge of the Latin language in general and of the 'latinitas' of a specific author in particular. Renowned as being manuscript hunters, humanist scholars equally used 'divinatio' when trying to restore lacunae or deciding which variant reading should be preferred.
The same goes for prominent humanist philologists as Erasmus and Lipsius. In this presentation, a case study will be offered in which both Erasmus' and Lipsius' editorial praxis in editing Seneca's philosophical oeuvre is analysed and contextualised.

Stefan Schorn
Editing historiographical fragments: methods and problems
In the first part of this seminary the participants will be given a general introduction in the modern concept of ‘fragment' and the methods of editing fragmentary (historiographical) texts. In the second part, these methods and typical problems will be illustrated with the help of some practical examples. A basic knowledge of Greek is necessary to attend this class.

Gerd Van Riel
How does a school become a school?
Authors owe their authority not only to the quality of their writings, but also to the reception of their thought by their pupils and successors, who wanted to propagate the truth established in their school, and/or to manifest themselves as the true heirs to the school's orthodoxy. Thus, the definition of ancient philosophical schools should not so much be grounded in the preservation of an objectively determined and a-historical insight, but in the dynamics of appropriating certain views and rejecting others, thus defining and redefining schools, and justifying their own views to the detriment of others. We shall discuss this process by looking at a number of examples from ancient philosophical schools.


Programme

Monday 2 July

9.30
Introductory sessions on textual scholarship
Gerd Van Riel
How does a school become a school?
11.30
Coffee break
12.00
Presentations by participants
13.00
Lunch
14.00
Methodological sessions
Stefan Schorn
Editing historio-graphical fragments: methods and problems
17.00
Presentations by participants
18.00
End

Tuesday 3 July

9.30
Introductory sessions on textual scholarship
Pieter De Leemans
Alia translatio planior... Scholarly Attitudes of Medieval Translators of and Commentators on Aristotle
11.30
Coffee break
12.00
Presentations by participants
13.00
Lunch
14.00
Methodological sessions
Pieter Beullens & Griet Galle
Vetus or nova? Case studies from the 12th- and 13th-century Aristoteles Latinus
17.00
Presentations by participants
18.00
End

Wednesday 4 July


9.30
Introductory sessions on textual scholarship
Caroline Macé & Erika Gielen
Manuscripts behind school walls: textual scholarship and education in Late-Byzantium
11.30
Coffee break
12.00
Presentations by participants
13.00
Lunch
14.00
Methodological sessions
Tara Andrews & Shari Boodts
Stemmatology
17.00
Presentations by participants
18.00
End

Thursday 5 July

9.30
Introductory sessions on textual scholarship
Geert Claassens
‘Magister' Maerlant
11.30
Coffee break
12.00
Presentations by participants
13.00
Lunch
14.00
Methodological sessions
Michèle Goyens
Editing an autograph: methodology and challenges
17.00
Presentations by participants
18.00
End

Friday 6 July


9.30
Introductory sessions on textual scholarship
Jan Papy
Renaissance Philology: Textual Scholarship and Divination in Erasmus and Lipsius
11.30
Coffee break
12.00
Presentations by participants
13.00
Lunch
14.00
Methodological sessions
Jeroen De Keyser
The transmission of Ciceronian speeches in the fifteenth century: a case study
17.00
Presentations by participants
18.00
End

Programme complet.

Source : Site de LECTIO

Lieu

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Localisation:
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven   -   Site internet
Route/rue:
Oude Markt 13
Code postal:
3000
Localité/ville:
Louvain (Leuven)
Pays:
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